About Me

My name is Ashton. I am a Stay-At-Home Wife and Mother of three boys and two girls, as well as, a Goldendoodle and Bernedoodle Breeder. I am so happy that you have found my blog and look forward to the many conversations that are started with these posts.

My passion is everything Goldendoodle and Bernedoodle or Dog in general really. My background is primarily in Genetics. I have my Bachelor’s in Biology and a minor in Chemistry, but my primary focus in these studies was Genetics. Above and beyond that, I have spent more time than I should probably admit researching everything about Goldendoodles and Bernedoodles, as well as some of their sister breeds.

My goal with this blog is to educate breeders and owners of proper breeding practices, health, genetics, socialization and more. If we can educate breeders and the public on all these things, we can all be on the same page, improve the breeds we love and stop improper breeding practices that are destroying these breeds.

I love to research, so if you have any topics you want to know more about send me a message and I will research it!

40 thoughts on “About Me

  1. I have some questions and was hoping to speak with you in person.. I have golden retrievers and am interested in producing a litter of golden doodles! I have put a deposit down on a poodle and now I am having second thoughts!!! Could you please provide me your phone number so I can speak with you?

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  2. Hi there!

    We are a couple in Norway who has a wonderfull F2 Goldendoodle that we want to set puppies on.
    She looks more like a poodle than a retriever so we wonder if you can tell us what is the best mix for here? I was thinking maybe f1b retriever or a retriever maybe?
    Can you please take your time and give us your opinion?

    Thank you

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    1. I would test her for furnishings (improper coat) and curl and make a coat decision from there. But before you make a coat decision, really evaluate her structurally. What are the traits that you want to bring out more with a stud? If you are looking for more of a Golden Retriever build, then find a stud that is structurally more Golden. I would suggest that if she comes back with two furnishing genes, that you find an F1, stocky built stud if she is built very much like a Poodle. But and F1b could also take on many of those Golden traits. It is all in the individual dog and what traits they took from their parent breeds.

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    2. I personally would get her coat tested since she is an F2 and can have any combination of genes, then decide on a stud coat wise. If she is built more like a Poodle, you are going to want something more Retriever trait wise, but you need to make sure that she carries two furnishing genes in order to maintain a proper coat (if that is your goal), but if all the health testing and structure complements each other, it is just a matter to testing furnishings and curl to determine if coats will match too. If she carries two furnishings and two curl genes, you can easily breed her back to a Retriever or an F1.

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  3. Hello Ashton! I have a couple of questions for you! I have a F2b female Goldendoodle that we want to breed. We are trying to find the right stud for her. She has a curly coat with the build of a poodle and her face shows more of the Golden Retriever. What generation would be the best to breed her with? Her dad was 50% Golden Retriever and 50% Poodle and her mom was 75% Poodle and 25% Golden Retriever. I also read on your blog that there are some tests we need done. Where would be the best place to get a Coat Test and Genes Test done? Are there any other tests I should have done? We are anticipating her third cycle starting sometime in March, my question is how far into her cycle should we have her with the stud? I am an eighteen year old in college. My Goldendoodle has been training to be my service dog and will be two years old in March.Your blog is amazing and so informational! Thank you so much for taking the time to inform others! Looking forward to future correspondence!

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    1. The best thing to do is to coat test her if you are trying to identify which type of stud you want for her. I personally would do all her health testing first though, as if she doesn’t pass those tests first then, she shouldn’t be bred, so you would be wasting your money on coat testing. But if all health testing is done, then I would go ahead and test for furnishings and curl. I personally use Paw Print Genetics and love them, as they double test everything with two different methods and I appreciate the customer service they have. Your girl could have any combination of genes with those parents. It is important that if you want a proper coat to make sure that one parent has two furnishing genes. So if she has only one, you will want to find a stud with two. If she has two you could use a stud with either one or two. Then you would want to make sure that the stud you use will complement her structurally.

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  4. Hi Ashton multiple friends have recommended your site. We have spent the last three or four months doing some digging/research and are looking for a breeder via a recommendation. Living in the New York area but willing to travel for the right new pup/ Goldendoodle to welcome into our home. Wanted to go on a limb and ask if you had any recommendations (fingers crossed super tight). Wouldn’t believe the situations / breeders we have met thus far. Aware much of the info on your site is for breeders, but wondering if you have interacted with breeders that you would recommend. Thanks in advance and happy holidays!

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    1. Hi, sorry about the delayed response. I just saw this. With welcoming our daughter last year we have been taking a break from our blog. I unfortunately don’t know of any close to you, but would recommend asking lots of questions and checking out their health testing, as well as pictures of where they raise their puppies.

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  5. Hello there! I have a beautiful f1b goldendoodle with a flat coat that I would like to breed. I’m not sure if I should breed her with another goldendoodle or with a standard poodle. Which would be better?

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    1. By flat coat, do you mean, no curl or no furnishings, as many people use these terms differently. If there is no furnishings and you want furnished coats, you could breed to a goldendoodle or standard poodle, but need to make sure that they are tested and have two furnishing genes. If it is a no curl coat, you could breed to any coat type depending on whether you want a curly coats or straight coats, but would again focus more on furnishings.

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      1. Hello! She has no curl at all, and no furnishings. Her father is a parti poodle, her mother a f1 golden doodle. I’d like the puppies to have furnishing and be curly coated. Is that possible? When looking for a dog to breed her with, will the owners know about the dogs genes?
        Thanks!

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        1. Do you have a picture? That would be very unusual for a dog off of a Poodle to have no curl and no furnishings. That being said, all you would need to do to get furnishings would be to breed to a dog with two furnishing genes. You would not be able to get curly coats, but could have wavy coats when bred to a dog that also has two curl genes. Most breeders that do health testing, also do coat testing and should know the genes that their stud dog has that way.

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          1. I would love to share a picture, but honestly don’t know how to add a picture to this reply box.
            Is there another way I could send you a photo?

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    2. By flat coat, you mean had no furnishings? Or no curl gene? Either way, you could breed to a Goldendoodle or a Standard Poodle, but you would want to make sure that if there are no furnishings that you breed to a dog that has two furnishing genes. As far as curl, that really is a personal preference and depends on what you are looking for.

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    1. I am not familiar with breeders in that area. I recommend asking others in your area for recommendations and screening the breeder based on health testing, temperament of their dogs and how they raise them.

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      1. I will be breeding my straight hair goldendoodle this summer. We live in North Carolina, close to Charlotte.

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    2. Hello! I have a question about breeding my Goldendoodle. She is a standard F1b Goldendoodle. Could I breed her with a miniature poodle to have a litter of mini Goldendoodles?

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      1. Yes, you could, but first you want to consider what traits your F1b has from both breeds and determine (after health testing is complete) what the best pairing would be for her. It is less about generation and more about health testing, structure and temperament.

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        1. I’m had her tested with paw print genetics. Her health testing is all clear.
          Her cu locus is cu/cu c, straight hair
          Her D locus is D/D
          Her IC locus is IC/IC, she has no furnishings
          Her Sd locus is SD/SD.
          I want to her pups to be more of a traditional Goldendoodle.
          Can I breed her with a mini poodle that has the furnishings and curly coat gene to achieve this?

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          1. That is very unusual to have an F1b that has no furnishings and no curl, as Poodles typically have two furnishing genes and two curl genes. I have occasionally seen one or the other, but never both. Curious for my own reference… is the poodle parent of your F1b registered and if so with what registry? If you are making this decision based on coat genetics and you want proper coats, you would need a stud that has two furnishing genes to get proper coats. The curl gene is a personal preference thing. If you want wavy coats breed to a dog with two curl genes. If you want straight coats breed to a dog with one or no curl genes, to get either 50/50 straight to wavy or all straight coats. Most people can’t even tell the difference between a straight coat and a wavy coat.

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            1. Her father is Rigby Who Is Here For the Parti, registered with AKC and CKC. I have his registration number too if that helps

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  6. Hi Ashton,
    I am a Goldendoodle breeder and breed mostly F1b Apricot/Red/Cream Goldendoodles. I am on a list to get a black and tan phantom AKC poodle female and want to breed black and tan Goldendoodles, either F1 or F1b. I am struggling to find a Goldendoodle with a non “ee” recessive red who has a “kyky” K Locus that allows for the expression of “at at” or “at a” at the A Locus . Otherwise, all the A Locus will be covered by the other dominate genes. Besides finding a rare black Golden Retriever or a Goldendoodle that carries these specific genes, is this even possible? What are your suggestions for phenomes that I would be looking for in a Goldendoodle stud? feel free to email me
    Sincerely,
    Ashley

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    1. It is definitely possible, but the best way to achieve this is to find ee Golden Retrievers or Goldendoodles that carry kyky. Find a breeder that tests this locus. Also, it will help if your Phantom Poodle is EE, then you could still breed to an eekyky dog and get all phantoms. There are also Phantom Goldendoodles out there too, they are just a little harder to find sometimes.

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      1. If I can find a Golden Retriever with ee, then that would be sufficient? I can’t find a Golden Retriever anywhere that has full testing of the K locus that is posted online. I’m wondering if they even have that or no one tests for it because it’s not possible with this breed… Please let me know what you think regarding this. Thanks!
        Ashley

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        1. Yes, there is really no need for Golden Retriever breeders to test for K locus because their dogs are all ee, but I do know of Goldendoodle breeders that have Golden Retrievers that throw KyKy, so they have to have a ky gene. I just think it is not common.

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  7. Hi, thank you for this information! I had a question, when looking at generations what does an F1bb goldendoodle bred to a poodle make? I can’t find this listing. My guess would be multigeneration? However, is this a good or bad thing quality wise? Does it make for insufficient coats or any bad genetics? Thank you for being willing to answer this.

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    1. An F1bb bred to a Poodle is an F1bbb. I personally would not want to do this cross, as it has a lot of Poodle and is loosing the characteristics of the Golden Retriever, even if you are selecting for that with each generation. You would loose some of the genetic advantages of genetic diversity with this type of breeding.

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  8. Hi, I have a 6 month old FI mini goldendoodle who will weigh about 30 lbs at full grown. She is a gorgeous red color. He genetic coat testing was F, IC carrier. sd/SD. She does not shed at this time. She has furnishings but wavy coat. She is a pretty little thing. I was studying genes and was wondering if she was bred back to a red poodle would I need to test the mini poodle for IC gene and or shedding being that he is a red poodle. Also was wondering what to think about long white hairs in her coat which I suspect come from her white English golden retriever mom. They just pop up once in a while. She had bmvery shirt hair on her legs but it is getting longer. She is so different from my F 1 boy who is a curly blonde. I am amazed by the genetics of Themis cross breed. Thank you so much for all the information you put out to the public. I am reading the Successful Dog Breeding book by Walkowicz. There is just not enough information on genetics. I feel he is a little outdated. The last book was written in the mid 1990’s. Do you recommend a book on breeding goldendoodles. There is limited information on the internet. I want to make sure I understand the genetics and not breed a puppy that is not a proper breeding. Thank you for any help you can give. Lela Kurtz

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  9. I have an F2 bernedoodle and my mom has an F2B bernedoodle. WOuld they be ok to breed as long as they have the furnish gene? Ive read where some will not even think of breeding an F2, but not sure why.

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    1. When deciding on breeding, generation is one of the last things I would look at. Health testing and temperament would be first, but if ou are asking for whether they will have proper coats, you just need to make sure that one of them has a two furnishing genes so that the whole litter has proper coats.

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